032215: E. Lockhart in Manila

Hi there, everyone! It has been more than three months since I last posted something in here, and I am extremely embarrassed about it. Sure I had been really busy the past semester with all the i-just-transferred-to-another-school-and-still-kind-of-adjusting thing that I didn’t bother writing about the recent book signing events that I had attended, but I’m glad I’m writing something now. So last Sunday, my Fangirls family (Jhed wasn’t around, though) and I went to see E. Lockhart. *throws confetti*. I did actually plan on going there exactly three hours before the registration (seven hours before the event). I was expecting a high number of readers because of all the hype with her latest novel We Were Liars, which even won an award on Goodreads just recently. But when I arrived six minutes past seven, the line was barely visible from the vehicle I was riding in, and I almost did a happy dance, but of course I didn’t. (I was beaming, though.)

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avid readers waiting for Emily to arrive (an hour or so before the event)

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Emily listening intently to a fan’s question

For those of you who are not familiar with the author, Emily Jenkins, who sometimes uses the pen name E. Lockhart, is an American writer of children’s picture books, young adult novels, and adult fiction. She is known best for the Ruby Oliver quartet and The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. (from Wikipedia)

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signing pass number 80 and my wonderful original cover of Frankie and of course, We Were Liars

A lot of people had asked me about where I did get that rare edition since all NBS had to offer was the latest edition of Frankie with the red cover, which I really really hate, by the way. I told them about my lucky day three years ago. I was just roaming around the bookstores, without any plan of getting anything (’cause I was broke) and then this area near the cashier with a big SALE sign caught my attention. There it was sitting  together with other books from unrelated genres. That time I was already a big fan of John and Hank and was into watching their videos. On one of his videos, John recommended this book and so I ran to the cashier before I changed my mind. I read Frankie several months after buying it, and I liked it. That was not one of those books that easily made it to my ‘favorites’ shelf, but it was wonderful. It was the first book that introduced me to the idea of panopticon. The author was a feminist and I find it really really cool.

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free bookmark yayy and that ‘woof’ was kind of hard to decipher (ps it’s a Basset Hound)

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THIS BOOK. THIS AWESOME BOOK THAT ALMOST BROUGHT ME TO TEARS WHILE FINISHING IT INSIDE THE BOOKSTORE. IF YOU HAVEN’T READ THIS, YOU MUST. RIGHT. NOW.

We Were Liars has to be one of the best books I have read this year and is definitely one of my all-time favorite YA books. It took me a long time before getting myself a copy because it’s slightly pricey for a paperback, but after reading it, I realized it was really worth every single peso I spent on it. I didn’t see the end coming. I started it the night before the signing and finished it the next morning. I tried keeping my cool. Thank God I was able to. OKAY READER. READ. IT. NOW. MY GAT.GAT GAT. *ugly sobs*

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THAT TAT, THOUGH

Out of all the authors who visited, her interview was by far my favorite. Her enthusiasm and humor will absolutely make you like her. She’s got awesome writing tips, too. She got us all laughing with her jokes and sarcastic side comments. Another thing is that she’s into torturing her characters, and whether we admit it or not, books that made us do an ugly sob will always have a special place in our hearts. (or it’s only me? Lol) On an average, a standalone has more or less than 60 000 words. Her writing tip got me thinking. She used email as an example. Imagine writing an email to a friend. It will only take you an hour, maximum. On an average, notice that it’s about 500 words. In a week, excluding weekends, that’ll get you 2500 words. In a month, you’ll have 10 000 words. After six months, you’ll have 60 000 — a novel. Sure, writing the draft is the most difficult part and you’ll most likely to edit it about 700 times, but what’s important is, you already have something, and it’s the first real step. She told us not to stop writing, and no matter how many times I’ve heard that same line before from different authors, that tip really got everyone in the event thinking. Maybe sometimes we just need to hear something like that, in my case, at least. (I’m not really into writing, though)

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Jas really has a thing for wacky poses

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unplanned book haul (MAUREEN’S BOOK IS SIGNED WHAT IS AIR I CANT OKAY BYE

“Once you have read a book you care about, some part of it is always with you.” ― Louis L’Amour, Matagorda/The First Fast Draw

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